Harmony of the Gospels

 HARMONY OF THE GOSPELS


(6) Jesus Appears to Two Disciples on the way to Emmaus
Scripture: Luke 24 13-35

Tom Lowe
10/7/2008

 


Date: A. D. 30
Location: The road to Emmaus

 


Those two men could have walked and talked for days and never gotten rid of their disappointment. Why? Because they lacked the key that unlocks the Old Testament: Messiah must suffer and die before entering His glory. Their hearts burned as they heard Him teach the Scriptures; and soon, the mourners became missionaries and shared the good news with others.


13, behold, two of them went that same day to a village called Emmaus, which was from Jerusalem about threescore furlongs.
14they talked together of all these things which had happened. 15it came to pass, that, while they communed together and reasoned, Jesus himself drew near, and went with them. 16their eyes were holden that they should not know him. 17he said unto them, What manner of communications are these that ye have one to another, as ye walk, and are sad? 18the one of them, whose name was Cleopas, answering said unto him, Art thou only a stranger in Jerusalem, and hast not known the things which are come to pass there in these days? 19he said unto them, What things? And they said unto him, Concerning Jesus of Nazareth, which was a prophet mighty in deed and word before God and all the people: 20how the chief priests and our rulers delivered him to be condemned to death, and have crucified him. 21we trusted that it had been he which should have redeemed Israel: and beside all this, to day is the third day since these things were done. 22, and certain women also of our company made us astonished, which were early at the sepulchre; 23when they found not his body, they came, saying, that they had also seen a vision of angels, which said that he was alive. 24certain of them which were with us went to the sepulchre, and found it even so as the women had said: but him they saw not. 25he said unto them, O fools, and slow of heart to believe all that the prophets have spoken: 26not Christ to have suffered these things, and to enter into his glory? 27beginning at Moses and all the prophets, he expounded unto them in all the scriptures the things concerning himself. 28they drew nigh unto the village, whither they went: and he made as though he would have gone further. 29they constrained him, saying, Abide with us: for it is toward evening, and the day is far spent. And he went in to tarry with them. 30it came to pass, as he sat at meat with them, he took bread, and blessed it, and brake, and gave to them. 31their eyes were opened, and they knew him; and he vanished out of their sight. 32they said one to another, Did not our heart burn within us, while he talked with us by the way, and while he opened to us the scriptures? 33they rose up the same hour, and returned to Jerusalem, and found the eleven gathered together, and them that were with them, 34, The Lord is risen indeed, and hath appeared to Simon. 35they told what things were done in the way, and how he was known of them in breaking of bread.

 

13 And, behold, two of them went that same day to a village called Emmaus, which was from Jerusalem about threescore[1]  furlongs[2].

This is one of the most delightfully fascinating stories in the New Testament. On the day that Christ arose, two people were making the journey from Jerusalem to Emmaus. Emmaus (means "despised people") is a journey of about seven miles. It would take two to three hours to walk the distance. One of the two travelers was named Cleopas (see verse 18), and he is said by the ancients to be the brother of Joseph, Christ's supposed father. He is mentioned only in one other place, in John 19:25[3], as the husband of a woman named Mary. We do not know the identity of the other, but there are several theories which have been put-forth.  The one returning with Cleopas may have been his wife, since both were disciples of Christ.  Also, there is one tradition that says it was Luke himself. And then, some think it was Peter; Christ did appear to Peter that day, which the eleven spoke of among themselves (v. 34), and Paul mentioned it in1 Corinthians 15:5[4]. But it could not be Peter that was one of the two, for he was one of the eleven to whom the two were returning; and, besides, we know Peter so well that we could say that  if he had been one of the two he would have been the chief speaker, and not Cleopas.  All we can be sure of is that it was not one of the original eleven disciples (see verse 33). At any rate, the two were speaking sadly concerning the death and burial of the Lord as they returned to their homes. These two men (or man and his wife) had probably remained in the city for the most important days of the "Feast of the Unleavened Bread", or had possibly tarried longer in Jerusalem than they intended, as a result of the crucifixion of their Master. 

14 And they talked together of all these things which had happened.

 As they travelled they talked together of all those things which had happened, including Christ's crucifixion and the reports of His resurrection. They were especially concerned with the probability of Christ's resurrection; because, according to the truth of the reports, they would either go forward or return back to Jerusalem.

15 And it came to pass, that, while they communed[5]  together and reasoned[6] , Jesus himself drew near, and went with them.

They discussed the recent events that had taken place in Jerusalem, and perhaps there was an argument, one hoping that their Master was risen, and would set up his kingdom, the other depressed, since he did not believe He had really risen. As they kept on walking, a stranger came alongside them; it was the risen Lord. He told them that he would appreciate their company.  Jesus graciously walked with them and listened to their "animated heated conversation".  No doubt they were quoting various Old Testament prophecies and trying to remember what Jesus had taught, but they were unable to put it all together and come up with an explanation that made sense.  Was he a failure or a success?  Why did he have to die?  Was there a future for the nation?

We should be encouraged to keep up Christian discussions and edifying conversations with our brothers and sisters in Christ, so that where at least two are involved in Christian conversation, Christ will come to them, and make a third. When God's people speak to one another of the Savior, the Lord hears them.

16 But their eyes were holden[7]  that they should not know him.

Although they had Christ with them, they were prevented by Christ from recognizing Him. Their eyes beheld Him, but they did not know him. It seems that the Lord's appearance was altered, (because it says in Mark that He appeared in another form), and a restraint was placed on their eyes (for here it is says that their eyes were held by a divine power). There are some who think the air around them was divinely changed so that they could not recognize who it was. But, no matter what happened, Christ commanded it in order for them to more freely talk with Him and He with them, and that it might give evidence that his word, and the power of it, did not depend upon Him being there in person.

17 And he said unto them, What manner of communications are these that ye have one to another, as ye walk, and are sad?

Jesus asked about their obvious sadness, which was apparently showing on their faces. Well, they had reasons for their unhappiness:
1. They had lost their dear Teacher, Leader and Friend, and were deeply disappointed since they had high expectations for him. They had given up hope for the cause they had served since the day they believed in Him, and they didn't know what to do next.
2. Although he was risen from the dead, either they did not know it or did not believe it, and so they were still in mourning.

What grief they would have been spared if they had only known and believed God's Word to begin with.  If we find ourselves hurting and depressed and do not find that Scripture speaks to our condition, it is not because the Bible has failed us, but because we do not know it well enough.  We cannot be profoundly comforted by that which we do not know.  We need to study our Bible with an eye to our Savior, because everything to do with our salvation and peace is "yes" in Christ.

18 And the one of them, whose name was Cleopas, answering said unto him, Art thou only a stranger in Jerusalem, and hast not known the things which are come to pass there in these days?

Jesus asked why they were so sad, and because everyone was aware of the reports and rumors concerning Christ's crucifixion and resurrection they assumed He was a stranger to those parts, and asked Him if that was the case. Cleopas was the one who was doing the talking, but I have noticed some things about this man:
1. Cleopas gave Jesus a civil answer. He does not rudely ask him, "What is to you, what we are discussing?'' and then tell Him to mind His own business.
2. He loves Christ, and wonders why every body doesn't love Him too.
3. He is very willing to enlighten this stranger concerning Christ, and to discuss his Master at length. He did not want any man to be ignorant of Christ.
4. It appears, from what Cleopas says, that the death of Christ made a great uproar in Jerusalem, so much so, that it was not likely that a stranger in the city would not know about it; it was the talk of the town. Eventually, the matter became universally known, and was explained, after the pouring out of the Spirit on Pentecost.

19 And he said unto them, What things? And they said unto him, Concerning Jesus of Nazareth, which was a prophet mighty in deed and word before God and all the people:

Jesus drew them out further with the question, "Why, what happened?" They answered by first paying tribute to Jesus, saying that He was a prophet respected by both God and man. That is true, but he was also the long awaited Messiah as well as God, and he didn't need for them to inform Him of anything, yet, with a great sense of drama, Jesus, the very One about whom all these events had centered, replied, "what things?" It was not that He didn't know "what things" had taken place, because, after all, he is God. But he wanted them to tell him what they knew, and then, he would show them from the Old Testament teachings that everything was done to fulfill prophesy and to accomplish God's purposes.

20 And how the chief priests and our rulers delivered him to be condemned to death, and have crucified him.

Then they related the account of how they had thought Jesus was the Messiah until His crucifixion had shattered their hopes; and then they added the baffling reports: (1) of His trial and crucifixion, (2) of His resurrection and (3) of the angels at the empty tomb, who clearly said that He was alive.  The words of Cleopas revealed the disciples estimate of Jesus.  They had not come into the full realization of his deity.

It is strange that they did not aggravate the matter more by blaming those that had been guilty of crucifying Christ; but perhaps because they were speaking to a stranger they thought it wise to avoid any criticism of the chief priests and their rulers.

21 But we trusted[8]  that it had been he which should have redeemed Israel: and beside all this, to day is the third day since these things were done.

Here is the real reason for their disappointment and their sadness: "WE TRUSTED THAT IT HAD BEEN HE WHO SHOULD HAVE REDEEMED ISRAEL." Great things were expected from him by tthose who looked for the redemption of the Jewish nation.

They questioned if Jesus was, in fact, the long awaited Messiah. Did His death pay the price of their redemption? Was His death necessary, in order to save Israel from their sins? Instead of questioning His ability to save, they should have believed in His resurrection, since that most difficult part of his mission was over. Now, they had more reason than ever to trust that Christ was the One that would deliver Israel; yet, at this point they are ready to give up the cause.

There were more reasons than ever to believe in His resurrection, because "This is the third day since he was crucified and died, and that was the day when He was expected to rise again, and rise in glory and splendor, and show himself to the public; but there was no sign of it.

22 Yea, and certain women also of our company made us astonished, which were early at the sepulchre;
23 And when they found not his body, they came, saying, that they had also seen a vision of angels, which said that he was alive.

They knew that there was a report circulating among the apostles and the people of Jerusalem that He is risen, but these two disciples of His only comment on it in passing, and they  don't give any credit to the report that "Certain women also of our company made us astonished who were early at the sepulchre, and found the body gone, and they said that they had seen a vision of angels, who said that he was alive; but we are ready to think it was only their imagination, for angels would have been sent to the apostles, not to the women, and besides women are easily fooled." These men did not believe the report of the women.  They did not believe the tomb was empty.  You can see how much unbelief there was in the resurrection at this time.  But there is a little hope and a little light that breaks upon the thinking of these two men.

24 And certain of them which were with us went to the sepulchre, and found it even so as the women had said: but him they saw not.

They acknowledged that some of the apostles had visited the sepulchre, and found it empty, "But him they saw not, and therefore we have reason to fear that he is not risen, for, if he was, surely he would have shown himself to them; therefore, the whole matter lacks proof, we have no great reason to think that he is risen, and therefore have no expectations from him now; our hopes were all nailed to his cross, and buried in his grave.''

25 Then he said unto them, O fools, and slow of heart to believe all that the prophets have spoken:

Jesus then lovingly scolded them for not realizing that this was exactly the pathway which the prophets foretold for the Messiah. First, He must suffer, and then he would be glorified.

Christ forbids us to say to our brother, "Thou fool." It was intended to restrain us from giving unreasonable rebuke, not from giving just reprimands. Christ called them fools, not in the sense of them being wicked men, but rather He knew they were weak men. He could have called them fools, because he knows our foolishness, the foolishness that is bound-up in our hearts. That which has condemned them of their foolishness is; First, their slowness to believe. Believers are branded as fools by atheists, and infidels, and free-thinkers, and their most holy faith is denounced as a tender gullibility; but Christ tells us that those are fools who are slow of heart to believe, and are kept from believing by prejudices never examined by someone who was impartial; Secondly, Their slowness to believe the writings of the prophets. He does mention their slowness to believe the testimony of the women and of the angels, and they were slow to believe the prophets, because they had not given the prophets of the Old Testament their due weight and consideration. If they had, they would have been as sure of Christ's rising from the dead that morning (being the third day after his death) as they were of the rising of the sun.

What was their real problem?  They did not believe all that the prophets had written about the Messiah.  That was the problem with most of the Jews in that day: they saw Messiah has a conquering Redeemer, but they did not see him as a Suffering Servant.  As they read the Old Testament, they saw the Glory but not the suffering, the crown but not the cross.  The teachers in that day were not unlike some of the "success preachers" today, blind to the total message of the Bible.

The key to understanding the Bible is to see Jesus Christ on every page.

26 Ought not Christ to have suffered these things, and to enter into his glory?

He shows them that the sufferings of Christ, which were such a stumbling-block to them, and made them unlikely to believe in his glory, were really the appointed way to his glory, and he could not go to it any other way: "Ought not the Christ (the Messiah) to have suffered these things, and to enter into his glory?" It was decreed by Almighty God, that the promised Messiah must first suffer and then reign, that he must go by his cross to his crown?'' Had they never read the fifty-third of Isaiah and the ninth of Daniel, where the prophets speak so very plainly of the sufferings of Christ and the glory that should follow?(1 Peter 1:11[9]). They were not able to reconciled themselves to God by the Cross of Christ, but Christ reconciled them to God by faith in Him.

Now, here he shows them two things which remove the offence of the cross:--First, That the Messiah ought to suffer these things; and therefore his sufferings presented no objections against His being the Messiah, instead were a proof of it, the same as the hardships faced by the saints are an evidence of their sonship. He could not have been a Savior, if he had not been a sufferer. Christ's undertaking our salvation was voluntary; but, having undertaken it, it was necessary that he should suffer and die. Secondly, that, when he had suffered these things, he should enter into his glory, which he did at his resurrection; that was his first step upward. Observe, it is called his glory, because he was duly entitled to it, and it was the glory he had before the world was; he ought to enter into it, for in that, as well as in his sufferings, the scripture must be fulfilled. He ought to suffer first, and then to enter into his glory; and thus the reproach of the cross is for ever rolled away, and we are directed to expect the crown of thorns and then share in His glory.

27 And beginning at Moses and all the prophets, he expounded[10]  unto them in all the scriptures the things concerning himself.

At this point, Christ was still unknown to these two travelers, and now, He took the part of One who is familiar with the Scriptures. He pointed out, from Genesis to Malachi, how it was predicted that the Messiah would suffer prior to His exaltation as King. He must have quoted from Psalm 22 and Isaiah 53. What a glorious Bible lesson it must have been for them, but how it must have grieved the Savior's heart to witness such a lack of faith and understanding in the very ones who claimed to be His followers
 
 He talked to them about the scriptures of the Old Testament, which spoke of the Messiah, and showed them how they were fulfilled in Jesus of Nazareth.  He told them more concerning Him than they could previous to this occasion, tell to Him. Beginning at Moses, He went in order through all the prophets, and explained to them the things concerning Him, showing that the sufferings he had gone through were so far from defeating the prophecies of the scripture concerning Him that they were the fulfillment of them. There are things dispersed throughout all the scriptures concerning Christ. You cannot go far in any part of scripture until you come across something that has reference to Christ, some prophecy, some promise, some prayer; because He is the true treasure of the Old Testament.  The apostles believed that the Old Testament is full of Christ, which Paul stated in the axiom, "For no matter how many promises God has made, they are yes in Christ" (2 Corinthians 1:20).

The things concerning Christ need to be talked about and explained. The eunuch, although he was a scholar, would not pretend to understand them, except some man should guide him (Acts 8:31[11]); because they were given in a different Dispensation[12], the Dispensation of Moses (a Dispensation of Works): but under the Dispensation of Grace, the veil is taken away and the New Testament expands on and explains the Old.

Jesus Christ is the best expositor of scripture, since he knows the scriptures perfectly because of his intimate union with the Spirit who is its Primary Author. He particularly knew the scriptures concerning Him; and even after his resurrection, the way that he led people into the knowledge of the mystery concerning him was by showing how the scripture was fulfilled.

When studying the scriptures, it is good to be methodical, and to take them in order, and it is good to observe how at sundry times, and in divers manners scripture interprets scripture. God spoke to the fathers concerning his Son, by whom he has now spoken to us. Some begin to study their bible at the wrong end, because they study the Revelation first; but here Christ has taught us to begin at Moses.

There are two things which are essential to the understanding of the Word of God.  They are simple but important.  First, as verse 25 indicates, we must have faith in the bible.  Christ said, "O fools, and slow of heart to believe all that the prophets have spoken." I think the bible is a closed book to the critic and the infidel.  He can learn a few facts, but he misses the message. On the other hand, some simple soul whose heart is turned in humble faith to God will be enlightened By the Holy Spirit of God.  In first Corinthians, 14 Paul declares, "but the natural man receiveth not the things of the Spirit of God: for they are foolishness unto him: neither can he know them, because they are spiritually discerned."

28 And they drew nigh unto the village, whither they went: and he made as though he would have gone further.
29 But they constrained[13]  him, saying, Abide[14]  with us: for it is toward evening, and the day is far spent. And he went in to tarry with them.

The disciples had learned so much and had such sweet fellowship with the Stranger that they are so captivated with Him, that they wished they could travel on with Him, but now they were near their home and it will be dark soon; hence, they invited their fellow-traveler to spend the night with them. At first, He courteously acted as if He were going to continue His journey; He would not force Himself upon them. It was late in the day and they appealed to Him to stay with them, and how richly they were reward! Christ yielded to their persistence, and He went in, to tarry with them. Very soon they will discover that they have been traveling the roads with Christ, and then they will begin to understand the meaning of what He told them about Himself.
Christ is now ready to give further instructions and reassurance to these two disciples of His. He has promised that if any man open the door, to bid him welcome, he will come in to him (Rev. 3:20).

30 And it came to pass, as he sat at meat with them, he took bread, and blessed it, and brake, and gave to them.

When they sat down for the evening meal, they asked their new friend (still not knowing He was the risen Christ) to ask God's blessing on their meal. Then the Guest took the place of the Host. The frugal meal became a sacrament, and the home became a House of God. That's what Christ does wherever He goes.

The two disciples began to suspect He was their Master, when "He took bread, and blessed it, and brake, and gave it to them;" and he did it in the same manner that he used to do it among his disciples. He must have acted with his usual air of authority and affection, and with the same gestures and demeanor they saw in the past when he blessed the bread and gave it to them to eat.  As ordinary disciples they had not attended the first Holy Communion; but probably the apostles had told them and the others how he had acted at the meal we call "The Last Supper" on the evening before his crucifixion.  And apart from this, during the period that they followed Jesus they would probably often have seen his procedure in breaking and distributing the food at ordinary meals.  But, as far as we know, the apostles were the only ones Jesus had instructed about the Lords Supper. 

This was not a miraculous meal like that of the five loaves, nor a sacramental meal like that of the Eucharist, but a common meal; yet Christ did the same here as he did in those, to teach us to keep up our communion with God through Christ, and to crave a blessing and give thanks at every meal. Wherever we sit down to eat, let us set Christ at the upper end of the table, take our meat as blessed to us by him, and eat and drink to his glory, and receive contentedly and thankfully what he is pleased to give us. We may be able to receive it cheerfully, if by faith we see it coming to us from Christ's hand, and with his blessing.

31 And their eyes were opened, and they knew him; and he vanished out of their sight.

As Christ broke the bread their eyes focused on His nail-pierced hands and they immediately realized it was their Lord. Then Jesus disappeared from their presence, and they recalled the walk and talk they had with Him along the way.

Once they discovered who he was, Jesus immediately disappeared: He vanished out of their sight. He withdrew himself from them, slipped away all of a sudden, and was gone from their sight. Or, he became invisible. It seems that although Christ's body, after his resurrection, was the very same body in which he suffered and died, which was apparent from the marks in it, yet he made it so very different that he could become either visible or not visible as he chose to make it, which was a step towards its being made a glorious body. As soon as he had given his disciples one glimpse of him he was gone. In the present life we have only fleeting views of Christ; we see him, but in a little while we lose sight of him again. When we have gone to heaven we will be able to see him without interruptions.

Whatever it was which had hitherto concealed him from them, it was now taken way; the mists were scattered, the veil was taken off, and they knew who he was. We live in the age of grace where Christ by his Spirit and grace makes himself known to the souls of his people. How does he do it?
1. He opens their minds to understanding scriptures.
2. He meets them at his table, in the ordinance of the Lord's Supper, and he is known to them in the breaking of bread.
3. But the work is completed by the opening of the eyes of their mind, and causing the scales to fall off from them, as from Paul's in his conversion. If he that gives the revelation does not give the understanding, we are still in the dark.

32 And they said one to another, Did not our heart burn within us, while he talked with us by the way[15], and while he opened to us the scriptures?

They retraced the day's journey, reflecting upon the things Christ talked about. No wonder their hearts had burned within them while He talked with them and opened the Scriptures. Their Teacher and Companion had been the risen Lord Jesus Christ. They did not so much compare notes as they compared hearts, as they reviewed the sermon Christ had preached to them. They found the preaching to be powerful, even though they did not know the preacher. He made things very plain and clear to them.

What is it that makes the heart burn; when we are affected by the things of God, especially with the love of Christ in dying for us? It happens when we love Christ in return and our heart is full of devotion to him. Sparks fly upwards towards God, when hearts feel love and devotion for Christ.

33 And they rose up the same hour, and returned to Jerusalem, and found the eleven gathered together, and them that were with them,

If they had had any thoughts of abandoning their relationship to Christ, then seeing and talking to him soon banished all such thoughts out of their mind, and this was enough to send them back to his flock. These disciples were filled with excitement from this experience, and felt they must go to their brethren, to give vent to their joys, as well as to give them satisfaction that their Master was risen.

Instead of spending the night at Emmaus, they raced back to Jerusalem (despite the fact that it was towards evening, where they found the eleven and others assembled together. "The eleven" here is a general term to indicate the original band of the disciples, excluding Judas. Actually not all eleven were present, as we learn from John 20:24[16], but the term is used in a collective sense.

34 Saying, The Lord is risen indeed, and hath appeared to Simon.

When they arrived they found the Jerusalem disciples discussing the same subject, and relating another proof of the resurrection of Christ. They found the eleven, and those that were their usual companions, gathered together late in the night, to pray together, and maybe, to decide what they should do at this juncture.

Before the Emmaus disciples could share their joyful news, the Jerusalem disciples jubilantly announced that the Lord had really risen and had appeared to Simon Peter. This appearance is only mentioned here and in I Corinthians 15:5[17]. Christ was no doubt preparing Peter for the leadership role he would assume in the early days of the church. Peter had reported meeting Jesus to his brethren; but, notice that Peter does not here announce it, and boast of it (he thought this did not become a repentant servant of the Lord), but the other disciples speak of it with jubilation--The Lord is risen in fact--really; it is now past dispute, no room is left to doubt it, for he has appeared not only to the women, but to Simon.  When he appeared to Simon Peter it was in secret, because there was something that needed to be straightened out.  Remember that Peter had denied him.  The restoration to fellowship was a personal private transaction between Peter and his Lord.

35 And they told what things were done in the way, and how he was known of them in breaking of bread.

Then it was the turn of the two from Emmaus to say, "Yes, we know, because He walked with us, came into our home, and revealed Himself to us in the breaking of bread." With the good news they reported they seconded Peter's testimony with an account of what they had seen. They told them what happened to them when Jesus met them on the road to Emmaus. The words that Jesus spoke to them as they walked home had a wonderful effect and influence upon them, and here they are called the "things" that "were done in the way." When Jesus speaks, it is not an empty sound, because his words are spirit and they are life, and wonderful things are done by them. They described how they recognized him by the breaking of bread; then, when he was carving out blessings to them, God opened their eyes to recognize who he was. Note, it would be a great tool to use for the discovery and confirmation of truth if the disciples of Christ would compare their observations and experiences, and communicate to each other what they know and have felt in themselves.

 

_________________Notes___________________

  [1]Sixty furlongs.
  [2]The furlong is a measure of length; 600 Greek feet, or one-eighth of a Roman mile, Matt. 14:24. Threescore furlongs would be a distance of 36,000 Greek feet, or 7.5 Roman miles.
  [3]Now there stood by the cross of Jesus his mother, and his mother's sister, Mary the wife of Cleophas, and Mary Magdalene.

  [4]And that he was seen of Cephas, then of the twelve:
  [5]Talked.
  [6]in the NT to discuss, dispute, question
  [7]Restrained; supernaturally prevented from recognizing the Lord.
  [8]hoped
  [9]Searching what, or what manner of time the Spirit of Christ which was in them did signify, when it testified beforehand the sufferings of Christ, and the glory that should follow.  
  [10]to unfold the meaning of what is said,
  [11]And he said, How can I, except some man should guide me? And he desired Philip that he would come up and sit with him.
  [12]The method or scheme according to which God carries out his purposes towards men is called a Dispensation. There are usually reckoned three Dispensations, the Patriarchal, the Mosaic or Jewish, and the Christian. These were so many stages in God's unfolding of his purpose of grace toward men. The word is not found with this meaning in Scripture.
--Easton's Illustrated Dictionary
  [13]compelled (by request)
  [14]Stay.
  [15]Highway.
  [16]But Thomas, one of the twelve, called Didymus, was not with them when Jesus came. 

  [17]And that he was seen of Cephas, then of the twelve: 

 

Please send your questions, comments, and prayer requests.

 While attending college, Robert Short told his mother he had become an atheist. She became very upset and cried for weeks. Sometime later, his life was transformed when he made a commitment to Christ. The next time he came home to visit, he told his mother he was now a Christian and had decided to become a minister. His mother again became upset. This time she thought he’d become a fanatic. Mrs. Short’s reactions to her son illustrates the distorted perception of commitment that is espoused by so many. We want to be included in the “roll call of the saints” but don’t wish to “go overboard” with zeal. Such mediocre “commitment” is described as “lukewarm” and is repulsive to the Savior who has given nothing less than his all.

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